Targeting stem cells that make you fat; A cancer challenge in Africa;

Stem Cells

> Researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston are targeting stem cells that make you fat. Release

> Eventually, pigs could grow human organs from a patient's stem cells for use as transplants. Story

> Duke University researchers have found out how mouse basal cells that line airways "decide" to become one of two types of cells that assist in airway-clearing duties. The research could help provide new therapies for either blocked or thinned airways. Release

Cancer Research

> Late diagnosis of cancer is far more common in the elderly than younger age groups, according to a study at Cambridge University. Story

> Heart disease beats breast cancer as the biggest killer. Release

> There are more than 200 dialects spoken in Africa, but most of them have no word for "cancer", and this despite the fact the disease kills more people worldwide than AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria together. So, where should Africa's medical profession start in the bid to increase screening? Story

Genetics

> Britain has dropped a policy of using DNA tests to identify the nationality of African refugees and asylum seekers after criticism that there is no scientific merit to the practice. Story

> Researchers in New York and Barcelona have identified a complex mechanism by which some proteins that are essential for life, called Smads, regulate the activity of genes associated with cancer. Release

> Researchers at Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida, have discovered three potential susceptibility genes for development of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), a rare neurodegenerative disease that causes symptoms similar to those of Parkinson's disease but is resistant to Parkinson's medications. More here

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