Start-up Aura in spotlight for nano-delivery work

For a start-up, Boston-based Aura Biosciences has been attracting considerable attention for its work on nano-sized hollow proteins that can be used to deliver cancer meds straight to their target. A few days ago, the World Economic Forum named Aura a Tech Pioneer, one of 26 technology companies that were recognized by the group.

Aura was founded by Elisabet de los Pinos, who earned her PhD at the University of Barcelona. After going on to earn her MBA, she worked as a marketing exec at Eli Lilly. But the chemotherapy drug she marketed was what she calls an "atomic bomb," blasting diseased and healthy tissue alike. And that made her think about devising a more targeted approach.

What she ended up with was a new technology program cobbled together from various sources in Europe. European angel investors pumped in $3.5 million, a pharma company stepped up with a co-development deal and the company is up and running, with plans to test the technology in humans. "The technology is very disruptive," says the scientist. "The impact it can have is huge."

- check out the article from BusinessWeek

Suggested Articles

Removing the IRE1-alpha gene from beta cells in mouse models of Type 1 diabetes restored normal insulin production, scientists found.

Selectively targeting TGF-beta1 with Scholar Rock's SRK-181 overcame primary resistance to checkpoint inhibitor therapy in mice.

Enhertu produced a 55.6% objective response rate in HER2-positive non-small cell lung cancer patients in a phase 1 trial.