Breast cancer 'smart bomb' prolongs life; 2nd Seoul professor investigated in alleged stem cell research fakery;

Cancer

> Researchers prolonged the lives of women with advanced breast cancer by using a "smart bomb" combining the gene-targeted therapy Herceptin with a toxic chemotherapy, and a chemical to separate the two until they reach the targeted cancer cell. Story

> University of California-Davis researchers and others have identified a number of proteins as both diagnostics biomarkers and potential drug targets for kidney cancer, using blood, urine and tissue analysis in an unusual mouse study. Release

> Scientists at the University of Texas Health Science Center are studying animals known as "naked mole rats" in the hopes of unlocking secrets to both cancer prevention and aging. Story

Genetics

> St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and Washington University have released for study the complete genomes of 260 St. Jude pediatric cancer patients and also the genomes of their tumors. Blog

> Scientists from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have identified a biomarker encompassing 5 genes that appear to predict Parkinson's disease with a large degree of accuracy. Item

Stem cells

> A researcher with University of California-Irvine has secured a $4.8 million grant to fund research devoted to developing a treatment for multiple sclerosis. Story

> It looks like a second professor from Seoul National University is being investigated on allegations of fabricating parts of a stem cell research paper. Story

And finally... The World Health Assembly is seeking ideas about how to fund biomedical research and development toward developing vaccines and drugs to treat malaria, tuberculosis and other diseases that affect people in poor countries. Blog

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