Buzz: GlaxoSmithKline prepares to unveil a new PhIII lineup

GlaxoSmithKline ($GSK) picked up a slate of new drug approvals in 2013, a key accomplishment for a pharma giant that set out several years ago to shake up a moribund, multibillion-dollar research operation. And a report from The Telegraph says they will use their looming review of the annual numbers to talk up prospects for 10 new late-stage programs, which should help ease the tension over some of their troubled Phase III assets.

According to The Telegraph, GlaxoSmithKline has 10 new programs to add to its Phase III watch, including new drugs for cancer and respiratory diseases--both areas earning big investments at the pharma giant. But details on GSK's big new wave of research projects are not available.

GlaxoSmithKline has earned kudos for its new drug approvals in 2013, a class of therapies that includes Tivicay, a potential HIV blockbuster advanced by a major joint venture that includes GSK, and Anoro Ellipta, the COPD therapy partnered with Theravance ($THRX). GSK has also submitted the GLP-1 drug albiglutide for an approval. But GSK has taken a number of shots at some ambitious disease targets. And some of the company's top prospects have encountered serious problems, flunking out on Duchenne muscular dystrophy with setbacks for the heart drug darapladib and the cancer drug MAGE-A3.

Those setbacks make this a particularly good time for GlaxoSmithKline to unveil some of the most promising work from its Discovery Performance Units. Their potential will be closely evaluated by analysts following the company. The annual numbers review is slated for Wednesday.

- here's the story from The Telegraph

Special Report: An ominous trend resurfaces as new drug approvals plunge in 2013 - Tivicay: GSK, Pfizer JV's HIV drug bound for blockbuster status

Suggested Articles

Fifteen of the 22 patients in a gene therapy trial no longer needed transfusions, while the remainder needed fewer transfusions.

Argos Therapeutics is ending its kidney cancer trial and mulling options, including a merger or sale, to stay alive.

CNS Pharma says berubicin is the first anthracycline drug to cross the blood-brain barrier and could transform treatment of the highly invasive brain tumor.