Terumo’s Vascutek and Bolton Medical merge to form single aortic device company

Terumo
Newly formed Terumo Aortic will have more than 1,100 employees and expected revenue of $200 million. (Terumo)

Two of Japanese device maker Terumo’s holdings, Vascutek and Bolton Medical, are merging to form a single entity focused on the aortic and vascular implant market.

The new merged company will be known as Terumo Aortic and is expected to have a combined revenue of about $200 million with more than 1,100 employees, the company said. The new company will continue to conduct its research and manufacturing operations in Glasgow, Scotland, and Sunrise, Florida.

The merger has been in the works for the past year with a particular focus on developing an integrated research and innovation strategy. Terumo Aortic offers devices for surgical grafts for abdominal, cardiothoracic and peripheral applications as well as hybrid and catheter-based stent graft systems for abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms.

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"We have woven together the products, services and expertise offered by our teams in Scotland and the United States, enabling clinicians to meet the unique needs of their patients and redefine the treatment of aortic disease,” Paul Holbrook, Terumo Aortic’s president, said in a statement.

Terumo acquired U.S.-based Bolton Medical a little over a year ago. Scotland-based Vascutek was purchased in 2002. In 2016, Terumo Medical shelled out $375 million to buy privately held Sequent Medical, which makes brain catheters. That marked the biggest deal for Japan’s top medical device firm since it bought CardianBCT for $2.6 billion in 2011.

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