Prevencio links with Atlas Genomics to roll out AI-powered blood tests for heart disease

EKG rhythm
Prevencio’s HART tests rely on machine learning to analyze blood samples for evidence of obstructive coronary artery disease, Kawasaki disease, the risk of heart attack or stroke, and more. (Pixabay / PublicDomainPictures)

With high hopes resting on Prevencio’s AI-driven blood tests, it’s only logical that the company would turn to Atlas Genomics to help shoulder the load.

Prevencio tapped Atlas' CLIA-certified molecular diagnostic laboratory in Seattle to support the commercial rollout of its HART blood test technology, which can now be ordered for research use. The financial terms of the partnership were not disclosed.

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Prevencio develops blood tests that identify cardiovascular diseases and other heart-related risks by using machine learning to parse dozens of protein levels and other biomarkers at once.

Of the seven HART diagnostics currently available, the company lists its lead three products—with plans to seek FDA clearances before 2025—as its tests for obstructive coronary artery disease, Kawasaki disease and one-year risks of heart attack, stroke or cardiac death.

“With more than 15 million U.S. heart disease patients, and tens of millions of additional patients at risk, there is a clear unmet need for highly accurate, AI-based, multi-protein blood tests,” Michael Kalnoski, Atlas’ CEO and chief medical officer, said in a statement.

The AI-powered tests, most of which were developed alongside Massachusetts General Hospital, have shown in clinical studies to deliver results with equal or greater accuracy than traditional methods for diagnosing cardiovascular risks and diseases.

Prevencio's test for Kawasaki disease is the newest in the portfolio, after being unveiled last September through a development partnership with Seattle Children’s Research Institute. It's designed to diagnose the rare and often fatal condition that inflames the walls of the arteries, which typically affects children under five years old.

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Prevencio’s partnership with Atlas builds on a previous agreement with Microsoft, signed in March 2020. That deal gave Prevencio access to Microsoft’s marketing expertise for its commercialization and tasked Microsoft’s healthcare-focused salesforce with pushing HART tests to its existing hospital and life sciences clients.

The agreement also integrated Prevencio’s AI into Microsoft's Azure cloud, which will now be used at Atlas' lab to process and analyze the HART tests, generate reports and deliver results to clinicians.