Philips launches small, push-button blood clot removal system

Placed next to the patient, Philips' push-button vacuum system is designed to pull out a clot through different sizes of placed catheters. (Philips)

Philips has launched a compact, single-use device for physically clearing potentially dangerous blood clots lodged in the arms and legs.

The QuickClear all-in-one system provides both an aspiration pump and a catheter for removing clots from peripheral arteries and veins, which the company says will offer faster overall procedures and eliminate the need for larger capital equipment and various accessories.

The small, palm-sized mechanical thrombectomy device received 510(k) clearance from the FDA. Placed next to the patient, the push-button vacuum system is designed to pull out a clot through different sizes of placed catheters.

RELATED: Philips unveils new EPIQ Elite ultrasound line, with vascular imaging capabilities

The device joins Philips’ peripheral portfolio, which includes interventional imaging and guidance systems, intravascular ultrasound devices and atherectomy devices for removing deposits and blockages within blood vessels.

In addition, Philips recently moved to acquire Intact Vascular, a Pennsylvania-based manufacturer of minimally invasive devices for peripheral procedures. 

The $360 million deal includes the Tack Endovascular System, a metal implant smaller than a stent, designed to reinforce artery disease treatments following balloon angioplasty both above and below the knee.

Suggested Articles

Bellicum’s shares are being routed after it announced a full house of horrors: poor data, a paused program and slashing the majority of its staff.

C2N Diagnostics launched a blood test that can identify the state of amyloid plaque in the brain, one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease.

Shortly after announcing plans to transform itself into a digital, “cloud-first” drugmaker, Takeda has extended its agreements with Seqster.