Pfizer, Syapse to mine real-world cancer data for insight into molecular testing strategies

healthcare data analytics
Syapse’s clinical knowledge base is derived from real-world data sources including electronic health records and molecular lab tests to provide a longitudinal view of a patient’s timeline within the healthcare system. (metamorworks/Getty Images)

Like Amgen and Roche before it, Pfizer has tapped Syapse to help provide precision medicine data gathering and real-world outcomes research for its work in cancer.

But where those collaborations focused on improving drug development and care delivery, Syapse’s latest undertaking will home in on the factors influencing oncologists as they choose different molecular testing and therapy strategies for individual patients.

“We look forward to working with Syapse and its network of health system partners to better understand the treatment journeys of people living with cancer and develop evidence-based insights that can help improve outcomes,” Pfizer Oncology’s chief development officer, Chris Boshoff, M.D., Ph.D., said in a statement.

In addition to its cancer platform, Syapse’s work with Big Pharma and other health systems has helped it construct a large clinical knowledge base derived from real-world data sources including electronic health records (EHRs) and molecular lab tests to provide a longitudinal view of a patient’s timeline within the healthcare system.

RELATED: Amgen, Merck, Roche get in on Syapse’s $30M round

With its previous benefactor Amgen, Syapse aims to develop analytics to identify clusters of patients within its network that may be a good fit for the drugmaker’s clinical trials, before study sites are chosen. The two companies also hope to build systems to assess outcomes in unmet medical needs and to develop new real-world evidence standards, according to the deal inked this past May.

Meanwhile, its January 2018 partnership with Roche covers four focus areas: developing a learning health system based on real-world evidence, examining the health economics impact of precision medicine on value-based care, connecting insights from EHRs to changes in quality of life and accelerating clinical trial enrollment and patient matching.

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