JPM: Ivenix taps new CEO as it brings its digital infusion pump to market

Empty boardroom
Infusion-related medication errors account for about half of the adverse drug events reported to the FDA, and account for more than $2 billion in annual healthcare costs. (Getty/Chris Ryan)

SAN FRANCISCO—Ivenix brought on a medtech veteran to be its new CEO as the manufacturer prepares to bring its next-generation infusion pump to the market. 

The Boston-based company tapped Jorgen Hansen to be its next chief, after securing a 510(k) clearance from the FDA in June 2019. The large-volume device was designed with a streamlined digital management system to help reduce medication errors and potential patient harm.

Before Ivenix, Hansen held multiple roles at Cantel Medical Corporation over the past seven years, most recently as president and CEO. Prior to that, he was senior VP of global strategy, marketing and innovation at ConvaTec, and a senior VP of global operations at Coloplast. He also serves on the board of the industry trade association AdvaMed. 

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“We are thrilled to have someone of Jorgen’s caliber leading Ivenix as we build our business and execute our market launch,” Ivenix Board Chairman John Douglass said in a statement. 

Jorgen Hansen (Ivenix)

RELATED: Next-gen infusion pump startup Ivenix nabs $42M to get to market

“Jorgen brings extensive market knowledge, strategy, product and business development experience at this important time in the company’s evolution,” Douglass added. “He is a seasoned medical technology leader with deep expertise in commercialization strategies that successfully drive company growth.” 

Ivenix’s device was designed to comply with the FDA’s guidelines on infusion pumps, which the agency updated in 2014 to address recurring safety problems. Infusion-related medication errors account for about half of the adverse drug events reported to the agency, and account for more than $2 billion in annual healthcare costs, according to the company. 

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