Genomics England taps Inivata for liquid biopsy pilot study

Blood
In the first part of a multiphase pilot study, Inivata and Genomics England will explore the use of plasma samples in liquid biopsy tests for cancer.

Genomics England and liquid biopsy player Inivata are partnering to assess the quality of blood plasma samples and investigate the use of liquid biopsy to improve cancer management and patient outcomes.

The pair will embark on a pilot study using Inivata’s inVision platform to analyze plasma samples collected in Genomics England’s 100,000 Genomes Project, according to a statement.

The pair will focus on the suitability of plasma as a sample for liquid biopsy, as well as using the inVision system to screen for mutations in the human genome that can lead to, or indicate the presence of, cancer. It is the first phase of a larger pilot project, the results of which will be shared with researchers around the world.

RELATED: Illumina enlisted for bioinformatics on 100,000 Genomes Project in U.K.

"As a company with a strong UK heritage, we are delighted to have partnered with the 100,000 Genomes Project … This pilot study will enable us to combine our efforts through the sharing of insights and the assessment of how liquid biopsy technology could ultimately transform cancer care within the NHS, saving lives and money,” said Inivata CEO Michael Stocum, in the statement. Inivata maintains operations in Cambridge, U.K., and Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.

The results could lead to the creation of less invasive sample collection for liquid biopsy and more effective monitoring processes, with the goal of improving cancer care, the company said.

Last year, Inivata picked up $45 million from the likes of JJDC and Woodford Patient Capital Trust in its series A round last year. The funding would support the development of its liquid biopsy for lung cancer.

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