Endotronix rakes in $45M for BP sensor implant and digital heart patient tracking

A stethoscope and paper money.
The myCordella app is for taking daily measurements of pulse, weight and heart rate, while the pulmonary blood pressure sensor can be implanted in an outpatient setting in less than an hour. (Getty/utah778)

Previous Fierce 15 winner Endotronix raised $45 million to fund development of its Cordella pulmonary artery sensor through CE marking and FDA premarket approval.

Its platform combines remote patient monitoring software with a wireless, implantable blood pressure sensor to provide early detection of worsening heart failure. The proceeds will also further commercialization of the Lisle, Illinois-based company’s Cordella digital heart failure system.

The series D round was led by LSP, with participation from Aperture Venture Partners, BioVentures Investors, Lumira Ventures, OSF Ventures, Seroba Life Sciences, SV Health Investors, Wanxiang Healthcare Investments and an unnamed corporate investor.

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“We are thrilled with the world-class leadership and support of LSP and our existing investor group as we launch into the next phase of our company,” said Endotronix CEO Harry Rowland. “This financing accelerates our U.S. and EU launch of the Cordella System and supports our upcoming landmark randomized, controlled clinical study, Proactive-HF, to demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of proactive heart failure management.”

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The cloud-based Cordella patient management program, usable with or without the pulmonary blood pressure sensor, consists of the myCordella app for taking daily measurements of pulse, weight, heart rate and other assessments, completed at home after the patient has seen a cardiology care team.

The pressure sensor, meanwhile, is designed to be implanted in an outpatient procedure taking under an hour. Patients will use a handheld device to take blood pressure readings from the sensor, in addition to other physiological data, to provide physicians with a more comprehensive view of the patient.

In January, Endotronix announced the successful first-in-human implantation of the pulmonary artery sensor. The company’s trial was designed to enroll up to 10 patients at two European sites.