Contextual Genomics launches new liquid biopsy test and updated solid tumor panel

laboratory
Both assays are integrated with molecular bar-coding to provide automated quality-assurance testing. (Pixabay)

Vancouver-based Contextual Genomics has launched two molecular hotspot assays for detecting genomic mutations in blood and solid tumors.

The new version of the company’s Find It solid tumor panel now screens for 146 somatic genome alterations, and 23 exons in 30 cancer-associated genes, to help identify precision cancer treatments and recognize drug-resistant mutations. New additions to the panel include tests for mutations in the POLE gene, which have been associated with colorectal cancer as well as immunodeficiency.

Meanwhile, the new Follow It panel screens for the same mutations in cell-free circulating tumor DNA found in blood plasma. Follow It can be used in patients with widespread metastatic disease at diagnosis, as well as a monitoring tool to gauge tumor burden and treatment resistance. It can also be used to follow disease progression, including in patients initially tested with Find It, according to the company.

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Both assays are designed for next-generation sequencing systems and are integrated with proprietary molecular bar-coding techniques to provide automated, centrally monitored quality-assurance testing. In addition, the Find It assay is supported by Contextual Genomics’ cloud-based genome analysis engine.

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