Boston Scientific redesigns, upsizes mesh sling system for men with stress urinary incontinence

Boston Scientific HQ
Following discussions with urologists to identify patient needs, the medtech company implemented a longer sling length to accommodate larger patient anatomies. (Boston Scientific)

Boston Scientific has launched a redesign of its mesh sling system, a surgical implant for relieving stress urinary incontinence in men, to make it easier to place and available to a broader population of men.

Positioned through a minimally invasive procedure, the sling compresses, moves and supports the urethra, helping the bladder to fully close. The most common causes of stress incontinence in men include complications following surgery and prostatectomies.

The company’s AdVance XP system includes a chevron-shaped anchoring mechanism for additional stability, as well as a longer sling length to accommodate larger patient anatomy, following discussions with urologists to identify patient needs, the medtech giant said.

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The AdVance XP system​​​ (Boston Scientific)

The new features aim to reduce slippage of the device following its placement or during physical activity, including changes to the mesh weave to help uniformly distribute the load.

According to Boston Scientific, the AdVance XP system has been used in the treatment of more than 20,000 patients globally, ahead of its U.S. launch. The company estimates about a half-million men worldwide suffer from stress urinary incontinence, with between 8,000 and 9,000 slings being implanted annually.

Boston Scientific also offers transvaginal mesh implants for treating stress urinary incontinence in women. The company has been the subject of adverse event lawsuits numbering in the tens of thousands related to its pelvic mesh products, as have other manufacturers in the medical device industry.

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