Tyrx gains Canadian regulatory nod for antibacterial envelope

Tyrx is revving up to roll out its Aigis antibacterial envelope in Canada, following regulatory approval there. It's a nice win for the New Jersey company and its signature product, which is designed to reduce the risk of infections after pacemaker or ICD implant surgeries.

The New Jersey company and recent FMD Fierce 15 winner has already been selling the FDA-cleared product in the U.S., where it says Aigis has been used in more than 25,000 patients. An Aigis envelope looks like an orange baby sock and also contains rifampin and minocycline--both antimicrobial agents. A pacemaker or ICD is placed in the sock and both are implanted in the patient, where the antibiotic is released over about 10 days to help prevent post-surgical infection.

Tyrx's story amounts to the little company that could. Initially founded in 1998, the company had partnered with Boston Scientific ($BSX) to develop a next-generation paclitaxel-loaded stent, but pulled out of the deal in 2007 before switching to its current product focus. Now, the 50-employee company, with more than $48 million in venture funding backing it to date, is on track to generate $10 million to $12 million in revenue in 2012.

Executives are also waiting for the FDA's clearance of a next-generation Aigis product that would be fully resorb able, hopefully in October. They await a CE mark for both Aigis iterations by the end of 2012.

In Canada, at least, Tyrx will start selling Aigis through a distribution partner.

- read the release

Special Report: Tyrx – 2012 Fierce 15

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