Startup raises $4M for sterilization with vaporized hydrogen peroxide

The PSD-85 Sterilizer--Courtesy of Sterilucent

Sterilucent has raised almost $4 million just about 6 months after the FDA cleared its product for use in healthcare facilities with tough surroundings such as combat hospitals and disaster response sites. The Sterilucent PSD-85 Hydrogen Peroxide Sterilizer uses low-temperature hydrogen peroxide that has been converted into a gas to sterilize medical devices for use in the field.

The FDA cleared PSD-85 last November. The sterilizer is designed to limit damage during transportation. As compared to the traditional steam sterilizers used in tough environments, the Sterilucent product also uses 80% less energy, the company said.

In addition, it said the PSD-85 is the only low-temperature sterilizer fit for combat surgical hospitals. It also has faster cycle times than current sterilizers in use in the field. Sterilucent also markets a series of products designed to ensure that the sterilizer has in fact worked correctly.

Sterilucent was founded in April 2004 as Phygen with initial funding from the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH). It obtained additional NIH, Department of Defense (DOD) and angel investor funding for its sterilization technology. The startup was renamed Sterilucent in April 2008.

The NIH and DOD have funded the company specifically in search of a hydrogen peroxide sterilizer that would work in combat surgical hospitals. Given their long-term commitment, it seems likely that the company is gearing up to start filling government orders now that its product has cleared the FDA.

The PSD-85 sterilizer secured a CE mark in March 2014.

"The Sterilucent products deliver safe and effective surgical instrument sterilization with reduced operating and logistical costs," Sterilucent COO Stephen Loes said in a statement on the occasion of the FDA clearance. "This is a significant benefit for our customers."

The financing was disclosed in a pair of April 13 SEC filings that are the first to disclose equity sales for the startup. In total, 14 investors participated in the financing.

- here are the first and second SEC filings

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