The next big thing in medical devices: renal denervation

Amid slumping cardiac device sales and industry-wide belt-tightening over the impending device tax, the potential payday for hypertension technologies stands out, to say the least.

The next-gen hypertension-treating devices use a method called renal denervation, deadening nerves in the kidneys and thereby sending signals to the brain to loosen up pressure in blood vessels and bring down blood pressure. Each CE marked tech does this a bit differently, however, and each company has been tripping over itself to release data asserting its device belongs at the top of the pile for one reason or another.

At the moment, the 5 devices approved in Europe are indicated only for drug-resistant hypertension, but, as doctors at the annual European Society of Cardiology meeting said last month, the constant flow of positive data suggests renal denervation technology will soon be OK'd for all forms of high blood pressure, giving doctors a choice beyond drug therapies.

Until then, the devicemakers are churning out safety and efficacy data left and right, angling for market superiority overseas. Here's what you need to know about the medical device world's next big thing. Click here to check out the full report >> -- Damian Garde (Twitter | email)

  • Medtronic's Symplicity
  • St. Jude Medical's EnligHTN
  • Covidien's OneShot
  • Vessix Vascular's Vessix V2
  • ReCor Medical's Paradise

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