NeuroDerm's minipump passes the patient test

Neuroderm has reported that Parkinson’s patients who have used its minipump levodopa and carbidopa delivery system have done so effectively.

The formulation ND0612 is a combination of the two Parkinson’s drugs that control symptoms of the disease by replacing reduced dopamine in the brain. The trembling and loss of coordination can be mediated by levodopa and carbidopa, but when administered orally, the symptoms can worsen. A continuous dose, however, has been shown to work.

NeuroDerm’s device is a small belt pump that delivers a controlled dose subcutaneously, achieving the constant administration thought to be better suited for the patients. Whether the patients could use the device was the big question, and NeuroDerm reported back positively. The company unveiled the results at the World Parkinson Congress in Portland, OR.

Event

Join the world's top medtech executives virtually for the leading event in medtech — The Virtual MedTech Conference by AdvaMed

Expect the same high-quality education, world-class speakers and valuable business development in a virtual format. Experience more of the conference with on demand content and partnering, as well as livestreamed sessions.

“Study results show that, following appropriate training, patients and their partners were able to independently operate the pump effectively in a simulated home setting,” NeuroDerm Medical Director Dr. Tamar Rachmilewitz said. “The data supported our assumption that ND0612 can be controlled by the patient as a simple-to-operate solution designed to achieve constant levels of [levodopa] in the blood and improve motor fluctuations that cannot be adequately controlled with oral therapy that may otherwise require surgical intervention.”

The 15 patients in the study had moderate to severe Parkinson’s and were trained with their partner or caregiver in a series of sessions. All of them were able to demonstrate operability.

“These results validate the ease of use of the ND0612 minipump delivery system, even in patients with motor dysfunction,” NeuroDerm CEO Oded Lieberman said. “A growing body of data suggests that ND0612 has the potential to transform the lives of PD patients, and the data presented at this conference show that this potentially transformative product candidate can be delivered conveniently in patients’ homes.”

Suggested Articles

Ironwood had once hyped this drug as a $2 billion-a-year asset, but IW-3718 has failed to live up to its high expectations.

The company describes the continuous glucose monitor as the world’s smallest and thinnest diabetes sensor, with a disc about the size of two pennies.

Junshi’s PD-1 blocker is already approved in China for metastatic melanoma, but the Shanghai-based biotech may soon add throat cancer to its label.