Mayo joins Sanovas to develop lung-clearing asthma treatment

Sanovas, a devicemaker specializing in microinvasive surgery for the lungs, joined forces with the Mayo Clinic to market its outpatient treatment for asthma that relaxes the muscles that constrict the airways.

The therapy, called bronchial thermoplasty, uses heat to reduce the smooth muscle in the airway that causes it to close in asthmatic patients. Mayo will team up with Sanovas in developing the technology, hoping to advance the clinical efficacy of the treatment. Sanovas will retain exclusive worldwide license of the Mayo patent, according to a release.

Often, severe asthmatics need multiple steroid medications and other dilatory treatments to relax the airways, but this therapy allows them to gain control of the condition.

"The spirit of this collaboration is to combine Sanovas' and Mayo Clinic's respective technologies and expertise to advance precision in the treatment and control of asthma," Sanovas CEO Larry Gerrans said in a statement. "We expect to commercialize an intelligent set of next-generation tools that will afford clinicians an intuitive command of the operating environment."

Sanovas will market the treatment exclusively with financial interest from Mayo.

"Our understanding of the etiology and treatment of autonomic diseases are ever-evolving," said Mayo's Samuel J. Asirvatham. "We are delighted to collaborate with Sanovas to advance the clinical science and capabilities in bronchial smooth muscle modification on behalf of these patients suffering from severe asthma."

- here's the release

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