FDA clears Ventec Life Systems’ VOCSN portable life support device

Ventec Life System's VOCSN was designed for everyday mobility so that patients can focus on their relationships with loved ones and live their life.

Ventec Life Systems, the maker of integrated respiratory systems, has received FDA 510(k) clearance for its portable life support device that combines ventilation, oxygen, cough assist, suction and nebulization therapies for patients.

Dubbed the VOCSN, the Bothell, Washington-based company touts the system as being 70% lighter and smaller than other currently available systems. The device has a 9-hour onboard battery that is controlled via a touchscreen and intuitive operating system. 

The device has been approved by the regulatory agency for use both in the hospital and at home for patients 11 pounds to adult, and was designed for patients suffering from neuromuscular diseases like muscular dystrophies, impaired lung function, cystic fibrosis, emphysema and other conditions, the company said.

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“I’ve seen firsthand how improved ventilator technology can enhance the quality of life for patients and caregivers,” Doug DeVries, founder and CEO of Ventec, said in a statement. “Our team didn’t want to create just another ventilator, we spent the past five years focused on building a truly integrated solution.”

The VOCSN system was designed with caregivers in mind as they can now switch between needed respiratory therapies with the touch of a button, allowing them to spend less time managing different systems and more time caring for patients. DeVries said he was inspired to create better respiratory solutions after his father was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).