Software takes on big data

Two product launches target the common need of researchers working in both drug discovery and development for tools that aid in managing vast quantities of data.

Bioinformatics software provider Qlucore has unveiled version 2.0 of the Omics Explorer data analysis tool, which the maker says boasts both speed and statistical analysis capabilities. And Pharsight has launched Phoenix WinNonlin as the cornerstone of a software platform for model-based drug development.

Qlucore Omics Explorer 2.0 (previously known as Gene Expression Explorer) is intended to provide fast analysis of high-sample-count data sets (100 million) on a regular PC. Enhancements allow for hierarchical clustering and data presentation as cluster trees and as a heat map; the latter in full sync with PCA sample, PCA variable, scatter and data table plot types. Scatter plotting is also available to show how one variable is distributed over a group of samples, for quality-control purposes and for presenting key findings and results.

Phoenix WinNonlin 6.0, for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling and noncompartmental analysis, is a desktop platform for model-based drug development. The release features a new graphical user interface and improved data management tools, as well backward compatibility with WinNonlin versions 4 and 5. It operates with the company's enterprise PK/PD data management system.

Pharsight has also released Phoenix Connect, which integrates applications built on the Phoenix platform with such commonly used third-party analysis and modeling tools as S-PLUS, NONMEM and SAS, and enables data import/export with such emerging standards as CDISC.

- here's the Qlucore release
- see the Pharsight announcement

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