BI faces trial data challenge

As the drug-maker rumblings grow louder for business intelligence that reaches the level of individual clinical trials, automation products to the meet the need are beginning to appear. The rumblings originate from both the trial operations and the executive management levels.

In a survey of 3,000 clinical operations and data management practitioners last fall, 75 percent told Winchester Business Systems that business intelligence is important to them. Their companies are looking for broader and more capable business solutions that can be used to analyze data, says the maker of Protocol Manager, a clinical trial management system.

And the recent study by ClearTrial, a maker of trial operations software, indirectly validates the Winchester findings: 87% of surveyed senior managers in portfolio management, corporate strategy, and clinical operations complained that they lack visibility into project-level ops, yielding incomplete business intelligence that hampers planning and decision-making. The ClearTrial software crosses traditional corporate boundaries and extends from trial operations to nonclinical parts of the drug-making enterprise.

Business intelligence is also the objective of Oracle's Clinical Development Analytics solution launched last month. The software giant positions the solution as one component of a BI suite that spans clinical development through post-marketing surveillance. The product's is built on Oracle's Business Intelligence Suite Enterprise Edition Plus, so the new offering taps an established corporate-minded foundation.

- here are the Winchester survey results
- see the Oracle announcement

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