CardioFocus bags $20M for a fib ablation catheter

human heart
CardioFocus got its endoscopic ablation system approved last spring and will use the funding to expand its commercialization.

CardioFocus closed a $20 million equity round, which will boost the commercialization of its endoscopic ablation system for the treatment of atrial fibrillation, as well as support the development of a next-generation device.

The HeartLight Endoscopic Ablation System scored FDA approval in April last year, after receiving a CE mark in 2009. The device is indicated for the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and, the company says, is the first to allow electrophysiologists to use direct visualization to guide ablation procedures.

Atrial fibrillation, a quivering or irregular heartbeat, is the most common type of serious arrhythmia, according to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The American Heart Association estimates at least 2.7 million Americans to live with a fib.

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The HeartLight system comprises an inflatable balloon attached to the end of a disposable catheter. It is used to navigate pulmonary veins and delivers laser energy to create small scars in the cardiac tissue so it can no longer conduct or sustain the arrhythmia.

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The funds will also drive the development of the next-gen HeartLight Excalibur Balloon. Based on the original HeartLight’s balloon design, the Excalibur will improve upon speed and amount of tissue contact during pulmonary vein isolation procedures, the company said in a statement Wednesday.

“[We] are encouraged by the positive feedback we have received to date on the Excalibur Balloon and look forward to obtaining European regulatory approval and making the technology commercially available by year end," said CardioFocus Executive Chairman Paul LaViolette, in the statement.

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