From Covance CEO to short-lived LabCorp diagnostics lead, Ratliff lands at AMRI

AMRI Headquarters
AMRI headquarters (AMRI)

John Ratliff’s position has changed three times this fall, but now, much like the falling leaves, he looks to have settled.

The former chief at major CRO Covance (now owned by LabCorp), Ratliff was announced back in October amid a raft of changes that he would be leaving his former post and moving up to lead LabCorp Diagnostics.

But that new role lasted three full business days when, mysteriously, LabCorp announced Ratliff’s immediate departure, with no explanation except one line about taking up a new opportunity.

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Now, we know what that is: He’s going back to contract research, taking up the chief job at CRO and CDMO Albany Molecular Research (AMRI). He takes over from Michael Mulhern, who moves upstairs to lead the board.

Being it was so short, AMRI makes no mention of Ratliff’s ultra-brief role as diagnostics lead for LabCorp. Unsurprisingly, nor did he: “I am excited to join AMRI and look forward to collaborating with a very talented group of professionals,” said Ratliff in a short statement.

RELATED: Kirchgraber promoted to Covance CEO as former chief takes the reins at LabCorp Diagnostics

“Together we will strengthen AMRI’s position as a market leader and strategic partner for pharmaceutical and biotech companies worldwide. Michael and his team have accomplished a great deal, and I look forward to leading AMRI through its next phase of growth.”

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