Curavit launches with aim to be 'next-generation' trial specialist

 Why wearables, health records and clinical trials need a blockchain injection
"Virtual" trial company Curavit aims to launch its first site in Boston later this year. (peshkov/iStockPhoto)

Getting the right patients into the right trial at the right time, and keeping them there, is a tough gig.

It’s a problem biopharma companies and their outsourcing partners have struggled with for years. One of the latest proposed solutions to this has been twofold: better tech and allowing patients to be trial participants in the comfort of their homes, both of which are thought to help retention and recruitment.

Curavit is the latest startup, launched officially this week, to offer this service via its telehealth and clinical trial tech platforms. It aims to “engage directly with patients in their homes,” according to its release.

How does it work? The company explains: “Our decentralized trial model means Curavit is not tied to any specific geography. We focus on patient populations across geographies and enroll patients that historically have not had access to clinical trials.

“To recruit this patient population, we partner with medical group practices and other health-related entities that historically have not participated in clinical research. Curavit enables these entities to take advantage of the benefits clinical trials provide without having to manage the actual trials. Together we recruit their patients for trials.

“Once patients are enrolled, we engage with the trial subjects via our tele-health solution. This enables the patients to participate from the comfort of their homes.”

It's run by CEO Joel Morse, former chief and founder at C3i, a pharma services-focused company, and machine learning and data analytics specialist Todd Morse, Curavit’s chief technology officer and co-founder, who formerly worked on products for the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative.

More details are scant at present, but the company said it plans to open its first site in Boston “this summer.”

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