Trial of Novel H1N1 'Swine' Flu candidate vaccine to take place in Adelaide

Trial of Novel H1N1 ‘Swine' Flu candidate vaccine to take place in Adelaide

Melbourne, Australia - 29/06/2009

CSL Limited, Australia's leading biopharmaceutical company, will shortly be commencing a clinical trial of a candidate vaccine against Novel H1N1 ‘Swine' Flu. The trial will be undertaken in partnership with Clinical Research Organisation CMAX and the Royal Adelaide Hospital in South Australia. 

Healthy adults aged between 18 and 64 years are being sought to participate, and must be available to meet four appointments in Adelaide over a 6 month period. 

The trial will involve participants receiving two injections of the vaccine, three weeks apart, and will compare a standard with an increased dosage of vaccine. Volunteers will need to submit to blood tests to check that they are generating an appropriate immune response to the virus. 

"We understand flu vaccines very well from our long experience with yearly seasonal strains, as well as research into novel flu vaccines." Global Director of Clinical Development at CSL, Dr Russell Basser said today. 

"We appreciate that new influenza strains like the ‘swine flu' can surprise us with properties that mean they might require higher dosing and two injections rather than one to provoke the desired level of immune response in humans."  

"CSL will be addressing these questions in the trial to ensure we know the optimum way for the vaccine to be given to protect against this strain of flu." 

It is anticipated that participants in the trial will commence being vaccinated in mid-July. This trial is being conducted with view to fulfilling a commitment to the Australian Department of Health and Ageing to supply up to 10 million people with a vaccine against Novel H1N1 ‘

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