Theorem Clinical Research Relocates Headquarters to Accommodate Growth

Theorem Clinical Research Relocates Headquarters to Accommodate Growth

<0> Theorem Clinical ResearchShawn Clary, 484-679-2400 </0>

has relocated its headquarters 1.5 miles from the original site in King of Prussia, Pa., where the company has been located for the past ten years. The new location was custom designed and will provide staff a spacious work environment and enhance the company's flexibility and capabilities to provide clinical research and development services for its clients.

Theorem, a full-service contract research organization (CRO) that provides core clinical research and development services, increased its new clientele during the past year, leading its executive administrators to decide to relocate to 1016 W. Ninth Ave.

According to Theorem Clinical Research Chief Executive Officer , the move was needed to accommodate Theorem's increasing number of employees. Potthoff predicts the new space will also enhance internal communication, generating better results for its clients.

"We have been anxiously waiting for this day," he said. "It's wonderful to be in our new office. As we grow, we continue to expand our capabilities to better serve our clients around the globe."

is a leading midsized provider of comprehensive clinical research and development services with offices in more than 30 countries and a customer base comprised of some of the world's leading pharmaceutical, biotech and medical device companies. A world leader in the most complex medical device and drug-device combination trials in addition to a notable capability in pharmaceuticals and biologics, Theorem has deep expertise in a broad range of therapeutic areas and in all phases of development. Some of the industry's top scientists and most advanced clinical analytics capabilities help ensure smooth-running, successful trials. For a full-service, right-size global research partner, don't think twice. .

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