TargetCancer Announces New Grants

Including TargetCancer Cholangiocarcinoma Cell Line Bank At MGH And Expansion Into Esophageal Cancer Research

NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- TargetCancer, a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting the development of lifesaving treatment protocols for rare cancers, is proud to announce over $70,000 in new grants to fund rare cancer research.

“We are enormously proud to announce these new grants today. Only two and a half years ago, our founder Paul Poth awarded TargetCancer's first grant of $7,500 and today we announce $73,000 to support critical rare cancer research,” explained Kristen Palma Poth, wife of Paul Poth and President of TargetCancer. “This research will have a profound impact on the treatment of diseases that have been overlooked for too long.”

Creation of cholangiocarcinoma cell line bank

TargetCancer awarded a $32,000 grant to create the TargetCancer Cholangiocarcinoma Cell Line Bank at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). This unique and innovative initiative unites researchers, surgeons, clinicians, and pathologists towards the goal of extracting and preserving critical cholangiocarcinoma (bile duct cancer) cell line samples that are essential to finding treatments.

Continued commitment to cholangiocarcinoma research

TargetCancer continues its commitment to cholangiocarcinoma research with $20,000 in additional funding to Dr. Nabeel Bardeesy’s lab at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center. This builds on TargetCancer’s grant of $40,000 in 2011 to support Dr. Bardeesy’s groundbreaking research into cholangiocarcinoma.

Expansion to esophageal cancer research

TargetCancer has expanded its research funding to a new rare cancer type with a $10,000 grant to support Dr. Adam Bass’ esophageal cancer research at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Dr. Bass is a leader in cancer genomics, and his current project is the largest genomic study of esophageal cancer ever attempted.

Harvard Medical School fellowships

With an $8,300 grant, TargetCancer funded the second year of its three year commitment to the TargetCancer Medical Student Fund at Harvard Medical School. This fellowship supports the summer studies of two students interested in researching rare cancers.

About TargetCancer

Launched in 2009 by Cambridge, MA resident Paul Poth, TargetCancer promotes the development of lifesaving treatment protocols for rare cancers. TargetCancer directly supports initiatives at the forefront of cancer treatment by funding innovative research, fostering collaborations and raising awareness among scientists, clinicians and patients.

When Paul, a dedicated husband, new father and a lawyer with a passion for public service was diagnosed with cholangiocarcinoma, he quickly learned that there was no real insight into the disease or its treatments. Due to lack of funds and research, Paul had no choice but to follow his doctors’ plans to patch together treatments for other forms of cancers.

Sadly, Paul did not survive this cancer, but he knew treatment for rare cancers does not have to be this way. After Paul’s passing, his wife, friends and family continued TargetCancer, in honor and celebration of Paul.

100% of donations directly fund TargetCancer’s research initiatives- all overhead and expenses are covered by sponsorships or reimbursement by TargetCancer’s Board of Directors.

Please visit www.targetcancer.info for much more information on all of these initiatives.

For more information on TargetCancer and their initatives or to set up an interview, please contact:
Pamela Lipshitz; [email protected]
(o) 212-256-0592; (c) 917-859-6852



CONTACT:

TargetCancer
Pamela Lipshitz, 212-256-0592
Cell: 917-859-6852
[email protected]

KEYWORDS:   United States  North America  Massachusetts  New York

INDUSTRY KEYWORDS:   Stem Cells  Education  University  Health  Biotechnology  Clinical Trials  Hospitals  Oncology  Philanthropy  Research  Science  Foundation

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