Stentys drug-eluting stent receives CE Marking

PRINCETON, N.J. & PARIS--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Stentys announced today that it has received CE Marking for its drug-eluting stent.

The unique self-expanding Stentys stent is designed to ensure optimal apposition of a stent in the critical initial hours and days after an AMI (acute myocardial infarction) procedure, by being continuously applied to the vessel’s internal wall even during thrombus resolution and vessel spasm relief—thereby avoiding malapposition, a major predictor of stent thrombosis.

“The clinical results of the Stentys DES in complex lesions have been spectacular, and we are thrilled that patients throughout Europe will have access to the benefits of our self-expanding stent in due course,” said Gonzague Issenmann, CEO and co-founder of Stentys.

Stentys will host a symposium on the treatment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) during ‘EuroPCR 2010’ on Tuesday, May 25th, 15:00—16:30 in room Bagatelle.

About Stentys

Based in Princeton, N.J., and Paris, Stentys intends to make treatment of complex blocked coronary arteries as simple and effective as a conventional stenting procedure. The Company announced in December 2009 that it has started enrolling patients in the randomized APPOSITION II clinical trial to compare the Stentys self-expanding stent against conventional stents in treating AMI patients, looking specifically at stent apposition and adaptation to vessel growth. Stentys was co-founded by Gonzague Issenmann and Jacques Séguin, M.D., Ph.D., founder of CoreValve, which was acquired last year by Medtronic for $700 million plus earn-outs.



CONTACT:

Ronald Trahan Associates Inc.
Ronald C. Trahan, APR, +1-508-816-6730
President

KEYWORDS:   United States  Europe  North America  France  New Jersey

INDUSTRY KEYWORDS:   Surgery  Health  Biotechnology  Cardiology  Medical Devices

MEDIA:

Logo
 Logo

Suggested Articles

Denali is partnering with Biogen on its Parkinson's disease program, netting a $560 million upfront fee and a $465 million investment.

In the first half of 2020, the regenerative medicine sector raised $10.7 billion, more than the total it raised in 2019.

The trial linked RG6346 to reductions in hepatitis B surface antigen that suggest the RNAi therapy can hold its own against drugs from J&J and Vir.