Roche dumps lead asset from its $725M Seragon buy

ARN-810 was leading the pack in Roche's acquired portfolio of investigational next-generation oral SERDs.

Back in 2014, Roche spent $725 million upfront on Seragon Pharmaceuticals, but three years down the line, it has now canned work on its leading drug, ARN-810.

In its first-quarter results announced today, the Swiss major quietly announced that the next-gen SERD drug, RG6046, has been “removed from phase 2” in HER negative advanced breast cancer.

No other details were given, but the compound appears to have been removed from the company’s roster of pipeline meds.

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Roche paid $725 million (with $1 billion in biobucks) for Seragon, a privately held biotech based in San Diego, California, three years ago.

Roche got access to Seragon's entire portfolio of investigational next-generation oral selective estrogen receptor degraders (SERDs) for the potential treatment of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. ARN-810 had been leading that pack, and was in phase 1 when it was subsumed into Roche.

Other meds from its buyout are still lined up in its pipeline, however, including RG6047 (GDC-0927, or ARN-927). 

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