PRESS RELEASE: MSD grants Adcock Ingram a license to manufacture and supply efavirenz

MSD grants Adcock Ingram a license to manufacture and supply efavirenz, an antiretroviral medicine for the treatment of HIV infection

Merck & Co., Inc., Whitehouse Station, New Jersey (which operates as Merck Sharp & Dohme (MSD) in many countries outside of the United States) the parent company of MSD (Pty) Ltd (a subsidiary registered in South Africa) has granted a non-exclusive, royalty–free license to Adcock Ingram for the manufacture and supply of a generic form of efavirenz (an antiretroviral [ARV] supplied by MSD under the trade name STOCRIN and used for the treatment of HIV infection). The granting of this license, together with a previous license granted by MSD to Aspen Pharmacare, enables South Africa's two largest generic manufacturers to manufacture and supply efavirenz, further supporting access to this important ARV therapy.

As a result of manufacturing efficiencies implemented, as well as increased production volumes, MSD has continuously been able to reduce the price of STOCRIN (efavirenz), which will continue to be made available at prices at which Merck does not make any profit from the sale of this medicine in Southern Africa.

Adcock Ingram’s efavirenz product is currently awaiting regulatory approval by the Medicines Control Council. Once launched, the product will complement Adcock Ingram’s existing range of 1st line HIV treatments that are available: Adco-Lamivudine, Adco-Zidovudine and Adco-Nevirapine.

The announcement of this significant new licensing arrangement with Adcock Ingram is in keeping with MSD's commitment to helping those living with HIV in South Africa.

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