Novavax's VLP Influenza Vaccine Named One of Top 100 Drugs in Development Today

ROCKVILLE, Md., April 5, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Novavax, Inc. (NASDAQ: NVAX) announced that its virus-like particle (VLP) influenza vaccine has been named by the editors of R&D Directions magazine as one of the top "100 great investigational drugs in development" today.  In its tenth annual list of promising clinical compounds, R&D Directions cited Novavax's virus-like-particle technology as a promising new approach to producing vaccines to prevent seasonal, H1N1 and avian influenza.  The list reflects the current interests of industry observers and analysts and is described in the magazine's March 2011 issue.

"We are honored to be recognized by editors and analysts who follow the pharmaceutical industry and gratified by their interest in our technology and vaccine candidates," said Dr. Rahul Singhvi, President and CEO of Novavax.  "Our recent BARDA contract award and new partnership with LG Life Sciences demonstrate the progress we are making and reflect the potential of our technology to revolutionize the development and production of influenza vaccines.  It is a very exciting time for our company and we appreciate this recognition of our work to prevent the spread of infectious diseases around the world."

About Novavax

Novavax, Inc. (Nasdaq: NVAX), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company, employs its cutting-edge technology to create next-generation vaccines to prevent serious infectious diseases, such as pandemic and seasonal influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). The company's proprietary VLP technology and single-use bioprocessing system enables rapid vaccine development and production where and when it's needed, worldwide. The company has formed a joint venture with Cadila Pharmaceuticals, named CPL Biologicals, to develop and manufacture vaccines, biological therapeutics and diagnostics in India. Additional information about Novavax is available on the company's website: www.novavax.com.

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