Luxembourg launches new bioscience initiative

The Luxembourg government has turned to three prominent biomedical science leaders in the U.S. for an international collaboration to establish a bioscience center in the heart of the European Union.

The government announced an ambitious plan to increase the pace of innovation based on research in the areas of molecular biology, systems biology and personalized medicine. The initiative will include formation of a centralized biobank/tissue repository, two major projects to further research in the field of molecular biology, which is the cornerstone of personalized medicine, and a project to demonstrate the effectiveness of new diagnostics tests for earlier detection and treatment of lung cancer.

The U.S. organizations involved in the collaboration are: The Partnership for Personalized Medicine led by Dr. Leland H. Hartwell, director, Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine in 2001 and president of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington; The Institute for Systems Biology, also in Seattle, led by Dr. Leroy Hood, president of ISB and co-founder of U.S.-based Amgen Inc.; and Arizona's Translational Genomics Research Institute, led by Dr. Jeffrey Trent, president and scientific director of TGen and former scientific director at the National Human Genome Research Institute of the National Institutes of Health.

- check out the press release

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