Life Technologies Names Chief Medical Officer

Life Technologies Names Chief Medical Officer
CARLSBAD, Calif., Oct 05, 2010 (BUSINESS WIRE) --

Life Technologies Corporation (NASDAQ: LIFE), a provider of innovative life science solutions, has named physician and clinical geneticist Dr. Paul R. Billings as Chief Medical Officer, a newly created position aimed at improving patient care through expanding the use of medically relevant genomic technologies in clinical settings.


Dr. Billings brings extensive expertise and clinical experience in the areas of genomics and molecular medicine. Most recently, he served as Director and Chief Scientific Officer of the Genomic Medicine Institute at El Camino Hospital, the largest community hospital in the Silicon Valley. He currently serves as a member of the United States Department of Health and Human Services Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health and Society, where he helps shape policy in the rapidly evolving field of genomic medicine.

"As a physician and industry expert, Dr. Billings brings to Life Technologies a deep understanding of the genomics revolution and its applications in patient care," said Gregory T. Lucier, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Life Technologies. "His expertise with new technologies and the adoption of genomics in medical care will help Life Technologies develop the tools that advance how genomic research today can be translated into effective clinical treatments in the future."

Dr. Billings will provide a clinical perspective as the company further develops its strategies in molecular medicine and the eventual transition of next generation sequencing into the clinic. In addition, he will represent the clinical value proposition of Life Technologies' diagnostic products and technologies to physicians, payers, patients and regulators and help drive clinical market adoption through key opinion leaders.

"We are at the onset of the age of genomic medicine, when sequencing a person's complete genome will produce accurate, medically relevant information that leads to better drug selection and beneficial treatment options," said Dr. Billings. "Life Technologies offers the broadest and best technologies for eventually advancing the use of genomics in clinical settings, and I look forward to helping translate those solutions into improved patient care."

Dr. Billings has had a distinguished career as a physician and researcher. He has been a founder or chief executive officer of companies involved in genetic and diagnostic medicine, including GeneSage, Omicia and CELLective Dx Corporation. Previously, he was senior vice president for corporate development at Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings (LabCorp). He has held academic appointments at some of the most prestigious universities in the United States, including Harvard Medical School, Stanford School of Medicine and the University of California, Berkeley, and has served as a physician at a number of medical centers throughout the country, including the University of California, San Francisco. He is the author of nearly 200 publications and books on genomic medicine. Dr. Billings holds an M.D. from Harvard Medical School and a Ph.D. in immunology, also from Harvard University.

About Life Technologies (http://www.lifetech.com)

Life Technologies Corporation (NASDAQ:LIFE) is a global biotechnology tools company dedicated to improving the human condition. Our systems, consumables and services enable researchers to accelerate scientific exploration, driving to discoveries and developments that make life even better. Life Technologies customers do their work across the biological spectrum, working to advance personalized medicine, regenerative science, molecular diagnostics, agricultural and environmental research, and 21st century forensics. Life Technologies had sales of $3.3 billion in 2009, employs approximately 9,000 people, has a presence in 160 countries, and possesses a rapidly growing intellectual property estate of approximately 3,900 patents and exclusive licenses. Life Technologies was created by the combination of Invitrogen Corporation and Applied Biosystems Inc., and manufactures both in-vitro diagnostic products and research use only-labeled products. For more information on how we are making a difference, please visit us online at http://www.lifetechnologies.com. Follow Life Technologies on Twitter @LIFECorporation and on Facebook.

Safe Harbor Statement

This press release includes forward-looking statements about our anticipated results that involve risks and uncertainties. Some of the information contained in this press release, including, but not limited to, statements as to industry trends and Life Technologies' plans, objectives, expectations and strategy for its business, contains forward-looking statements that are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results or events to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Any statements that are not statements of historical fact are forward-looking statements. When used, the words "believe," "plan," "intend," "anticipate," "target," "estimate," "expect" and the like, and/or future tense or conditional constructions ("will," "may," "could," "should," etc.), or similar expressions, identify certain of these forward-looking statements. Important factors which could cause actual results to differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements are detailed in filings made by Life Technologies with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Life Technologies undertakes no obligation to update or revise any such forward-looking statements to reflect subsequent events or circumstances.


SOURCE: Life Technologies Corporation

Life Technologies CorporationTim Ingersoll, [email protected]

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