Jubilant signs MOU with Alabama researchers

India's Jubilant Organosys, the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), and Southern Research Institute will form a joint venture that will focus on developing affordable treatments for the oncology, metabolic disorders and infectious diseases therapeutic areas.  

The trio signed a memorandum of understanding in Washington, D.C. Under the terms of the MOU, researchers from each institution will, among other things, secure federal funding to create new research jobs; select promising biological targets; develop drugs through preclinical and/or Phase II development; and license drugs to other companies.

"UAB has tremendous strength in research that identifies the targets--usually proteins--that contribute to the disease process, whether it is cancer or diabetes," Richard Marchase, UAB VP for research and economic development, said in a statement. He added that Southern Research and Jubilant have the knowledge and expertise in drug discovery and testing that ultimately will help the partners discover commercially viable medicines.  

Word of the agreement comes days after Jubilant announced that one of its subsidiaries will partner with Duke University on drug discovery and development. The non-exclusive collaboration will apply Jubilant Biosys' proprietary portfolio of drug development capabilities toward discoveries made by the faculty of the Duke. The parties shall complete definitive agreements by the first quarter of 2010.

-  read the joint release about the latest agreement
-  learn more about the Duke agreement here

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