Free e-book: Social media for Pharma

Social media is fraught with potential pitfalls for pharma brand managers. But, as the new FiercePharma e-book Social Media for Pharma Brand Managers points out, they needn't approach it with such trepidation.  

There is a lot of confusion on rules guiding social media and pharma companies, but the FDA plans to issue guidelines this year that should answer many drugmakers' questions. The agency has already solicited comments on such topics as adverse event reporting and whether companies should post corrective information if errors appear on third party sites. This free e-book explores these topics and also explains how to effectively reach consumers.

One of the most important lessons to take from the book is that pharma brand managers learn to find consumers "where they live,"--that is, dig into where consumers are already getting their drug-related information online, including sites like WebMD and YahooHealth. And they're also using social media outlets like Facebook and Wikipedia.

This 14-page, in-depth, visually appealing analysis also examines social media failures-including last year's "Motrin Moms" backlash against a Johnson & Johnson unit. The company aired an ad that offended mothers using the baby sling, and the negative response on Twitter was immediate. J&J never "tested the social media waters" to see how real moms would respond. But while there are examples of social media blunders, there are also successes, such as J&J's McNeil Pediatrics ADHD Moms Facebook site.

If your company is planning an online push, this e-book is an essential guide to navigating the social media world. Click here to download this free e-book. - Liz Hollis (twitter | email)

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