ASH roundup: Ariad, Cephalon and Novartis make a splash

There's plenty of news spilling out of the ASH meeting today. Here's a roundup of the highlights.

  • Ariad Pharmaceuticals made a splash, says TheStreet, with promising early-stage data from AP24534, demonstrating activity in patients with resistant or refractory chronic myeloid leukemia and Philadelphia-chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. TheStreet also highlights new data from Cephalon for Treanda as a new standard of care in first-line therapies for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. A combination of "Treanda and Roche/Genentech's Rituxan demonstrated superior progression-free survival (55 months) compared to patients treated with the current standard of care." Item

  • Shares of Sunesis Pharmaceuticals, meanwhile, jumped after the developer announced new data showing that its drug voreloxin improved the survival rate of patients with treatment-resistant leukemia. Report

  • Geron's stock price also benefited from the news that its cancer vaccine met its safety and tolerability goals in a mid-stage trial. GRNVAC1 targets telomerase, an enzyme found in malignant tumors. Article

  • CytRx noted that preliminary data for its drug tamibarotene demonstrated promising results for treatment-resistant patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia. Report

  • Novartis stirred considerable interest with its new data demonstrating that Tasigna worked better than Gleevec in treating newly diagnosed cases of leukemia. Analysts say the drug, which has been on the market for two years, has the capacity to generate sales of up to $5 billion a year. Item

  • Reuters reports, meanwhile, that Celgene was struggling--apparently successfully--to convince analysts that new data for Revlimid was more positive than negative. Article

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