ALSO NOTED: Immunogen licenses antibody; GenVec amends trial plans; analyst bullish on biotech; and much more...

> Immunogen has licensed the exclusive right to develop an integrin-targeting antibody developed by Centocor. Centocor stands to gain $30 million in milestone payments. Release

> Following discussions with the FDA, GenVec says it will amend its Phase II/III pancreatic cancer clinical trials with its drug TNFerade in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. The primary efficacy endpoint will now be measured at overall survival rather than 12-month survival. Release

> Lazard analyst Joel Sendek is talking up the biotech sector, suggesting that quite a few of the public drug developers are trading at a discount. Report

> 2007 Fierce 15 company QuatRx Pharmaceuticals announced positive results from a pivotal Phase II study of Ophena (ospemifene) to treat postmenopausal women with vulvovaginal atrophy, a common condition associated with menopause. Release

> OSI Pharmaceuticals plans to offer $150 million in convertible senior notes. Report

> Galapagos said it has entered into a new, two-year oncology target discovery collaboration with Janssen Pharmaceutica. Report

> Doe the pharmaceutical industry's ties to the American Psychiatric Association determine the official list of mental illnesses? Report

> What's a pharma CEO with high cholesterol to do? Take his company's statin, of course. But Novartis chief Daniel Vasella (photo) eschews Lescol in favor of... Pfizer's Lipitor. Report

And Finally... You've read our trends and predictions for the biotech industry. Now take a look back at the pharmaceutical industry in 2007 and find out what to expect in 2008. Report

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