Latest Headlines

Latest Headlines

Lilly, BI's Jardiance posts 'amazing' 14% reduction in major CV events

Since Eli Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim announced that their SGLT2 med, Jardiance, had become the first to show it could lower the risk of major cardiovascular events, the question on the minds of industry watchers has been "How much?"

Zealand Pharma gains 20% after PhIII success clears path to diabetes payday

Zealand Pharma has taken a step toward collecting milestones worth up to $160 million (€142 million) and double-digit royalties. The paydays are tied to the success of its diabetes alliance with Sanofi, the prospects of which were buoyed this week with the release of Phase III data.

Novo racks up Tresiba data for impending mano a mano with Sanofi's Toujeo

Novo Nordisk is out trumpeting new data on its next-gen basal insulin Tresiba and a combo med, Xultophy. New studies to brag about are always good things. But they're particularly well-timed now, with the FDA on the verge of a decision on Tresiba--and analysts fairly certain that the drug will get the agency's stamp of approval.

Jardiance and its CV data? They're no knockout punch for stalwart Januvia, Merck says

LONDON-- Late last month, partners Eli Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim announced that their SGLT2 diabetes med, Jardiance, had gone where no others had gone before. While its rivals had always either increased the risk of cardiovascular events or, at best, had no effect, the newcomer showed it could actually lower the risk of heart attack, stroke and death from cardiovascular causes.

No change in CV risk for ACS patients on Sanofi's Lyxumia

Back in June, researchers unveiled details of the ELIXA trial, which put Sanofi's Lyxumia in the clear as far as cardiovascular safety risks go. Now, a new analysis of the study shows that in Type 2 patients with acute coronary syndrome, the diabetes med didn't increase the rate of cardiovascular events--but it didn't decrease it, either.

UPDATED: It's confirmed: 'No signal' of heart failure risk with Merck's Januvia

The good news keeps rolling in for Merck when it comes to the cardiovascular safety of its DPP-4 inhibitor, Januvia. According to a new analysis of the TECOS trial, patients with Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease--even those with a history of heart failure--can take the drug without an increased risk of CV complications.

Novo Nordisk looks at building its first U.S. insulin plant

Denmark's Novo Nordisk has filling, packaging and a device manufacturing in the U.S., but when it comes to its insulin API production, it has kept that close to home. But CEO Lars Rebien Sørensen says it looks like it might be time to open its first plant in the U.S.

Sanofi deepens its Evotec ties with a $330M diabetes deal

Sanofi is expanding its relationship with close partner Evotec, signing a deal worth up to $330 million to collaborate on cell-replacement therapies for diabetes.

Mystery solved: Star biotech team rallies behind a $36M diabetes spinout from Salk

The mystery of Ron Evans' new biotech startup has been solved. Armed with $36 million in cash from A-list venture investors and backed by a pro team recruited from Rich Heyman's Aragon/Seragon starring cancer drug startups, the prominent Salk investigator and his old buddy Heyman are coming out of stealth mode today with a new company called Metacrine.

Sales of diabetes drugs in Japan are a key H2 performance gauge, Sanofi CEO says

Olivier Brandicourt, CEO of Sanofi, gave his thoughts on the July 30 earnings call about trying to launch a simplification program in the midst of high-profile global rollouts, competition and dealmaking. He also picked one contest to watch in Japan that may be a good gauge of the company's performance on all counts.