Stemedica files IND for stem cell therapy; NYT piece details travails of consumer genetic testing;

Stem Cell Research

Stemedica Cell Technologies has filed an IND to test a new adult stem cell therapy to treat ischemic stroke. Report

UC Denver's School of Medicine has opened a new stem cell research center. Story

The Robertson Foundation has donated $10.2 million to Duke University to create a state-of-the-art Translational Cell Therapy Center. Story

A new growth factor has been found that stimulates the expansion and regeneration of hematopoietic (blood-forming) stem cells in culture and in laboratory animals, say Duke University Medical Center scientists. Release

Genetics

In an in-depth article, New York Times' scribe Andrew Pollack concludes that relatively high prices and little practical use have conspired to keep the consumer genetics tests offered by 23andMe, Navigenics and DeCode Genetics a novelty that few people are willing to pay for. But as costs plummet and understanding grows, that could change. Story

Scientists have discovered three genes that could shed light on the genetic causes of blood-clotting disorders such as thrombosis and some types of stroke. Release

Jacques J.M. van Dongen and colleagues, at Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Netherlands, have identified a new genetic cause of antibody deficiency, mutations in the CD81 gene. Release

Cancer Research

DNA analysis has revealed a genetic variation linked to an increased risk of lung cancer among people who have never smoked. Story

Genetic changes in bone cells may help trigger leukemia, U.S. researchers say, and interrupting those signals may offer a new path to treating the disease. Story

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