Gene deletion study defuses disease risk from fat

A new study in mice raises the possibility that humans may one day be able to eat any kind of fat they want without raising their risk of heart disease. The study involved deleting a gene in the mice that causes production of ACAT2, an enzyme that alters the molecular structure of cholesterol so that it can be transported to the body's cells.

"We deleted an enzyme in mice and they could eat any type of fat and not get heart disease," said Lawrence Rudel, Ph.D., a professor of comparative medicine. "If you're a mouse, it's great. Of course, we don't know yet if it will be the same in humans."

- read the release for more information

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