FierceBioResearcher is now FierceBiotech Research

Arsalan Arif, Fierce Life Sciences publisher

As a publisher, there is one metric I track above all else: reader engagement. By any measure of that, FierceBioResearcher continues to be one of our most successful publications. While I'm mindful not to bore you with online publishing industry terminology, we at Fierce are understandably excited about the unparalleled level of interaction we have with our readers. We measure that through our high unique open rates, click-through rates, web pages viewed per visitor, and a few proprietary in-house Fierce metrics.

In short, we judge ourselves on how relevant we are to our readers and their everyday work. We're always looking for ways to improve the publication so we can continue serving you.

I want to extend a big thanks to the hundreds of readers I've spoken to in person and by e-mail over the last few months. While I plan to put several of their suggestions to work by the end of this year, there is one immediate change we're making effective today: FierceBioResearcher is now known as FierceBiotech Research.

Outside of the name, everything else you and 34,000 of your colleagues in early stage drug development have come to rely on remains the same. John Carroll, our Editor-in-Chief, will continue bringing pre-clinical research and development news and analysis with his authoritative editorial voice. We're making the name change to better align our weekly publications with their parent publications FierceBiotech and FiercePharma--it's a minor touch that we're confident readers will appreciate. I'll have more on this in the coming weeks and months.

As always, I'm eager to hear questions and comments from our readers, so please get in touch. Thanks for your continued participation in the FierceBiotech Research community.

Arsalan Arif, Publisher
(E-mail | Twitter)

PS: Please remember to add [email protected] to your safe senders list. Next week, FierceBiotech Research will be sent from this new address.

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