Even PETA says 'neat' to in vitro meat; Test your kids for 'sports genes?';

Stem Cells

> In vitro meat, grown from stem cells. Or, as the New Yorker puts it, "test-tube burgers." Even PETA is onboard. New Yorker Abstract | Gizmodo Australia article

> Stem cell star Sean Morrison to GOP: "You don't compete by looking for ways to put stem cell biologists in jail." Story on AnnArbor.com

> Researchers in Canada have developed an automated microfluidic cell culture platform to monitor the growth, survival and responses of hundreds of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) at the single cell level, according to a news release. The new tool will allow scientists to study many different types of culture conditions at the same time and gain insights on the growth factor requirements for HSC survival. Release

Cancer Research

> More than 2,000 cancer patients have signed up to clinical trials at the Leeds Cancer Research UK Center since its official opening last year. Report

> Some men of African descent may have a higher genetic risk of developing prostate cancer, according to research conducted at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California. Release

> Scientists confirm direct link between bowel cancer and red meat consumption. Story

Genetics

> Parents can get their kids genetically tested for "sports genes." Wonder if they also make one for kids who might want to see if they'd be good in the concert band and chess club. Story

> Australian and Chinese researchers have reached an agreement to conduct research into genetic associations in diseases in the hope of developing new diagnostics and therapies. Story in GenomeWeb

> An ode to Daphnia pulex, or why the water flea is wonderful for genetic research. Item

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