CROs see a mixed bag of new research trends

In a sign of the times, Donald Garcia, the medical director for Austin-based CRO FutureSearch Trials, says he's been seeing more executives turn out for a new trial for depression.

"At one time, two out of three new patients were financial advisers," Garcia tells the Austin Business Journal. "The economic downturn has contributed to the worsening mental health of a lot of people around here." And Garcia adds that it's been getting easier to recruit new patients for clinical tests as unemployment rises.

The ABJ counts a variety of CROs at work in central Texas, including PPD, Covance and Cedra. And some of the clinical research specialists say that they're looking at a mixed bag of new trends. On the one hand, they say, it's getting easier to recruit patients for trials. But as more and more developers cut back and look to conserve cash, they're shelving drugs that would otherwise be pushing ahead into new studies.  

"In general, they are pausing a little bit to figure which ones can be put on hold," said Matt Walker, executive vice president of business development and marketing for ResearchPoint. "The industry as a whole is seeing a lower volume than it was a year ago."

- check out the article in the Austin Business Journal

Suggested Articles

Removing the IRE1-alpha gene from beta cells in mouse models of Type 1 diabetes restored normal insulin production, scientists found.

Selectively targeting TGF-beta1 with Scholar Rock's SRK-181 overcame primary resistance to checkpoint inhibitor therapy in mice.

Enhertu produced a 55.6% objective response rate in HER2-positive non-small cell lung cancer patients in a phase 1 trial.