Construction starts on world's largest stem cell research center; Tomato fights cancer;

Stem Cell Research

The world's largest stem cell research center broke ground on Monday at Stanford University. When completed, the 200,000-square-foot, $200 million facility will house 600 scientists. Report

One of the UK's top stem cell scientists, Newcastle University's Colin McGuckin, says he and his 10-man research team will move to France. The move, he says, has been prompted by a bias towards embryonic stem cell research and away from the adult stem cell approach he has adopted. Story

Novo Nordisk, Cellartis and the Lund University Stem Cell Center of Sweden will collaborate on a new program to make insulin-creating cells from human stem cells. Report

Doctors at the University of Miami have used a catheter to inject human stem cells into patients' hearts, offering a cheaper, simpler approach that the open heart surgery used now. Report

Cancer Research

A new tomato designed to be loaded with the nutrients found in dark berries can help prevent cancer in mice, according to a new study. Article

Genetics

The NIH has partnered with scientists, advocacy groups and families to launch the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project, a five-year study designed to explore the genetic causes of epilepsy and how people respond to therapies. Report

MIT is creating a new facility that will delve into advanced brain research through the genetic manipulation of the nervous system. Story

Scientists have identified a gene in mice that plays a central role in the proper development of one of the nerve cells that goes bad in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease, and some other diseases that affect our motor neurons. Release

There's a genetic link between obesity and colon cancer risk, according to researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Report

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