Clip cancer chromosomes to more easily kill tumors; An apple (related drug) per day could beat back bowel inflammation

Cancer

> By shortening the end caps on chromosomes in human cervical cancer cells, scientists can disrupt their DNA repair signaling, making them more sensitive to radiation treatment and easier to kill quickly, according to a new study in Cancer Prevention Research. Release

> Researchers are testing an experimental drug that makes brain tumors glow hot pink, allowing for a more precise removal because surgeons can easily distinguish between the tumor and healthy tissue. Release

Alzheimer's disease

> Alzheimer's disease can initially cause patients to lose their sense of smell, but a Case Western researcher discovered it can be restored in mice by removing the plaque-forming protein amyloid beta. Release

> Accumulation of the destructive brain plaque found in Alzheimer's disease happens after a diametric shift in the levels of two proteins involved in folding, moving and cutting other proteins, researchers at George Health Sciences University have found. Release

Genetics

> DNA sequencing is becoming faster and cheaper, but the advance outpaces researchers' ability to analyze the data, potentially delaying the routine use of the process in medicine, The New York Times reports. Bioinformatics companies are filing the gap. Story

> Scientists from Germany have combined two techniques to help guide precisely where new genetic material is inserted into a cell's DNA. Release

> Scientists with genomics organization BGI, including researchers in Cambridge, MA and Shenzhen, China have found new clues as to how the mutation of genes involved in a form of kidney cancer affect its progression. Release

Regenerative medicine

> Xeltis will begin human pediatric clinical trials in Germany of growing, self-healing cardiovascular grafts engineered from a patient's own tissue. Release

And Finally... The next new drugs to treat ulcerative colitis and other bowel inflammation disorders could come from polyphenols in apple peels. Release

Suggested Articles

Compass' CD137 agonist cleared large tumors in mice that other I-O agents had failed to treat. It's advancing the drug into phase 1 human trials.

UPMC researchers are planning clinical trials of a COVID-19 vaccine that uses pieces of the virus' spike protein to create immunity.

Treating mice with niacin increased the number of immune cells in glioblastomas, reducing tumor size and extending survival.