Bacteria could kill bone cancer cells; Marijuana use could induce genetic psychosis;

Cancer research

Children diagnosed with bone cancer could benefit from better treatment thanks to new research at The University of Nottingham. The Bone Cancer Research Trust is funding a new project, testing a theory that 'friendly bacteria' can be used to kill bone cancer cells. News release

California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute said they are able to treat mice with terminal stage cancer using an antibody that impedes certain protein molecules that feed cancer cells. Story

With regulatory filings in the works for abiraterone acetate, Johnson & Johnson is touting interim Phase III data demonstrating a four-month increase in median survival rates for late-stage prostate cancer victims. Story

Stem Cells

Is the United States set to steal the UK's stem cell birthright? Story

If you want to get in on the first human trials of embryonic stem cells, it is going to be tough. Story

Genetics

Smoking marijuana might not make you go nuts, but if you're very sensitive to its effects, that could be an indication of your genetic risk for psychosis. Wow, man. Report

Are you shaped like a pear or an apple? If you're a woman, 13 recently located genes--rather than your lifestyle--may make all the difference, according to a study in Nature Genetics. Story

Everybody, jump into the heart disease data pool. An international consortium has been set up to study the genetic origins of heart attack and coronary artery disease. As it must have been too formulate its forced acronym, the CARDIoGRAM (Coronary Artery Disease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-analysis) consortium sounds like a huge undertaking, aiming to combine and analyze data from all currently published genome-wide association studies on heart attacks and coronary artery disease. In all, the data cover more than than 22,000 patients and 60,000 healthy individuals, Researchers hope to identify the small effects of the large number of genes involved in this condition. Story

And Finally... Stem cell poetry contest winners. Yes, you read that correctly. A stem cell poetry contest. Enjoy

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