Building Biotech 3.0: The new rules of a changing game

The R&D business model in biopharma is changing.

Companies and programs are built for speed these days. As each new development niche has emerged--whether it's in immuno-oncology, gene editing or rare diseases, or all of the above--companies and division leaders are starting with a Phase I-through-pivotal-study sketch, looking to see how programs can be remodeled and compacted into a tighter schedule and filling in the blanks along the way. New drugs are put into the clinic as companies are investing big sums in manufacturing and regulatory work. Trials are melded together. Partners are won and lost. Disruptive new technologies have to be evaluated and adapted on the run.

Compared to what the R&D game looked like when FierceBiotech launched 14 years ago, it's a brave new world at companies. And it's being remodeled as we speak.

That Biotech 3.0 vision is what we'll be exploring at my upcoming executive breakfast during BIO's annual conference in Philadelphia. And we have some of the top disruptors in oncology R&D, who are responsible for advancing some bellwether drug development programs, on hand from Merck ($MRK), Juno ($JUNO), J&J ($JNJ), AstraZeneca ($AZN) and GlaxoSmithKline ($GSK) to discuss what it takes to compete these days.

Also, it's a great environment for some old-fashioned networking, which is what BIO is all about, right?

I hope to see you there. You can check it out and register here for one of the most important discussions now reshaping the industry. -- John Carroll, follow me on Twitter @JohnCFierce

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