A new strategy for fighting melanoma

The notion that cancer stem cells are responsible for much of the worst damage associated with the disease took another step forward with the release of a new study from Harvard Medical School that identified antibodies that could be used to slow melanoma, the most lethal form of cancer. Co-author George Murphy noted that their work shows that cancer stem cells can be effectively targeted, offering a new therapeutic approach for a range of cancers. There's been a growing belief that cancer cells aren't all made alike, with a particular emphasis on stem cells that appear to be resistant to chemotherapy. The next step is to take the animal studies into man. Researchers suggested that this approach toward fighting cancer could become common in just a few years.

"If this works with melanoma, this may also work with other tumors that are notoriously difficult to treat" once they have spread, Dr. Murphy told the Boston Globe.

- read the article in the Boston Globe

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