Contextual Genomics launches new liquid biopsy test and updated solid tumor panel

laboratory
Both assays are integrated with molecular bar-coding to provide automated quality-assurance testing. (Pixabay)

Vancouver-based Contextual Genomics has launched two molecular hotspot assays for detecting genomic mutations in blood and solid tumors.

The new version of the company’s Find It solid tumor panel now screens for 146 somatic genome alterations, and 23 exons in 30 cancer-associated genes, to help identify precision cancer treatments and recognize drug-resistant mutations. New additions to the panel include tests for mutations in the POLE gene, which have been associated with colorectal cancer as well as immunodeficiency.

Meanwhile, the new Follow It panel screens for the same mutations in cell-free circulating tumor DNA found in blood plasma. Follow It can be used in patients with widespread metastatic disease at diagnosis, as well as a monitoring tool to gauge tumor burden and treatment resistance. It can also be used to follow disease progression, including in patients initially tested with Find It, according to the company.

Webinar

How ICON, Lotus, and Bioforum are Improving Study Efficiency with a Modern EDC

CROs are often at the forefront of adopting new technologies to make clinical trials more efficient. Hear how ICON, Lotus Clinical Research, and Bioforum are speeding database builds and automating reporting tasks for data management.

Both assays are designed for next-generation sequencing systems and are integrated with proprietary molecular bar-coding techniques to provide automated, centrally monitored quality-assurance testing. In addition, the Find It assay is supported by Contextual Genomics’ cloud-based genome analysis engine.

Suggested Articles

The ADDF announced its second round of research awards, with a total of $6 million in new funding for diagnostic tests.

Novartis unveiled more data showing how its asthma combo QMF149 fared against the standard of care: a combination of the same types of drugs.

Johns Hopkins researchers developed a biodegradable polymer to transport large therapies into cells—including genes and even CRISPR.