Tryton raises $20M for stent system development

Durham, NC-based Tryton Medical has closed a $20 million Series D round of financing. The devicemaker is developing the Tryton Side Branch Stent System, a strategy for treating atherosclerotic lesions in the side branch at the site of a bifurcation. Current investors PTV Sciences, RiverVest Venture Partners and Spray Venture Partners contributed to the round; the financing was lead by private healthcare investor Arnerich Massena.

Tryton's stent system has already turned in positive results from a first-in-man study and clinical results from almost 200 patients in four different registries with a rate of target lesion revascularization of less than 4 percent. Company CEO Tony Arnerich says the funding will allow the company to conduct pivotal trials of the system and help it drive adoption internationally. The stent system has already received approval in Europe.

"We are excited to invest in Tryton and believe the Side Branch stent represents a truly elegant solution to a difficult clinical problem in interventional cardiology," says investor Massena in a statement. "With more than 2,000 implants, Tryton has established its Side Branch stent as the leading solution for these challenging cases."

- here's Tryton's release

PLUS: SuperDimension, which develops minimally invasive interventional pulmonology devices, has raised $24.8 million in debt and equity financing in two separate transactions. The Minneapolis-based company is using 3D mapping software, called electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy, to detect and diagnose lung cancer. Release

Suggested Articles

Takeda tapped Roche’s Foundation Medicine to develop tissue- and blood-based companion diagnostic tests for its portfolio of lung cancer therapies.

Cellex has announced plans to develop a rapid coronavirus test that people can fully perform at home, from sample collection to result, using an app.

More than 20 states either don’t release or have incomplete data on the rapid antigen tests now considered key to containing the coronavirus.